Web 2.0 in Science

 Hannay, T. “Web 2.0 in Science,” CTWatch Quarterly, Volume 3, Number 3, August 2007. http://www.ctwatch.org/quarterly/articles/2007/08/web-20-in-science/

 This article has a great description of how Web 2.0 started and what it entails.

The following segment is a good quote:

So what does it mean? Web 2.0 began as a conference,[1] first hosted in October 2004 by O’Reilly Media and CMP Media. Following the boom-bust cycle that ended in the dot-com crash of 2001, the organisers wanted to refocus attention on individual web success stories and the growing influence of the web as a whole. True, during the late 1990s hype and expectations had run ahead of reality, but that did not mean that the reality was not epochal and world-changing. By the following year, Tim O’Reilly, founder of the eponymous firm and principal articulator of the Web 2.0 vision, had laid down in a seminal essay[2] a set of observations about approaches that work particularly well in the online world. These included:

  • “The web as a platform”
  • The Long Tail (e.g., Amazon)
  • Trust systems and emergent data (e.g., eBay)
  • AJAX (e.g., Google Maps)
  • Tagging (e.g., del.icio.us)
  • Peer-to-peer technologies (e.g., Skype)
  • Open APIs and ‘mashups’ (e.g., Flickr)
  • “Data as the new ‘Intel Inside’” (e.g., cartographical data from MapQuest)
  • Software as a service (e.g., Salesforce.com)
  • Architectures of participation (e.g., Wikipedia)
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